The Origins of 'Forced Unlawful Carnal Knowledge'

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Jan
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The Origins of 'Forced Unlawful Carnal Knowledge'

Post by Jan » Wed Aug 18, 2004 5:51 pm

Found this while searching for Swear words.

Intercourse

Although this sounds like the most Anglo-Saxon of all Anglo-Saxon words, the origin of the f-word meaning 'sexual intercourse' is actually rather obscure. There is a legend that the old name for the crime of rape was 'Forced Unlawful Carnal Knowledge', and part of the punishment was that an abbreviation of the crime would be branded on the perpetrators head. Hence, people with 'Fx Ux Cx Kx' on their head were known to be rapists.

If your girlfriend press charges just tell the court she said the f-word and show them this text. :mrgreen:

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Mister Pringle
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Post by Mister Pringle » Wed Aug 18, 2004 6:50 pm

alas, the etymology of the f word is not fully uncovered, but it seems that it is unlikely to be an acronym as they have only become widely used in the last century, whereas f--- dates back to the thirteenth century (i might be a century or too off, but it was certainly several hundred years ago)

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Post by Jan » Wed Aug 18, 2004 7:19 pm

Branding people in the forehead also seems to be very barbaric and barbarianism (or whatever the ism word of that is) can easily label any custom of several hundreds of years old.

Tho I think it's much more likely to have been reserved for the common people and the lower parts of society or peasants and servants.

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Re: The Origins of 'Forced Unlawful Carnal Knowledge'

Post by Fluffy17 » Wed Aug 18, 2004 7:40 pm

Janmanden wrote:Found this while searching for Swear words.

Intercourse

Although this sounds like the most Anglo-Saxon of all Anglo-Saxon words, the origin of the f-word meaning 'sexual intercourse' is actually rather obscure. There is a legend that the old name for the crime of rape was 'Forced Unlawful Carnal Knowledge', and part of the punishment was that an abbreviation of the crime would be branded on the perpetrators head. Hence, people with 'Fx Ux Cx Kx' on their head were known to be rapists.

If your girlfriend press charges just tell the court she said the f-word and show them this text. :mrgreen:
I heard it had something to do with the German word for fox's spelling "fuchs" and it showed bestiality. :?

Your explaination is much more... believable and overall better.
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Post by choyrt » Wed Aug 18, 2004 10:34 pm

I read that it was possibly a mishmash of what lonely Shepards did with their sheep. That aside, I also read that is was a mishmash of a German pronounced Russian word meaning 'Duck' as in the flying kind.

Who knows.

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Post by Ewen Brown » Wed Aug 18, 2004 11:09 pm

stupidity causes violence

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Post by Runenklinge » Thu Aug 19, 2004 12:41 am

the 'fornication under consent of the king' variant is my favourite

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Post by Jan » Thu Aug 19, 2004 12:48 am

Could be mistaken of course but those sites except the google search seems to be american (clueless). I found the link that contains the best and most plausible explanation, imho (the one I initially posted) again.

The Origins and Common Usage of British Swear-words

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Post by apoxuponme » Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:13 am

I rely on snopes.com to answer my questions on topics like this...

Snopes says:
Eric Partridge, in the 7th edition of Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (Macmillan, 1970), said that the word "fudge" almost certainly comes from the Indo-European root peuk = "to prick" (which is the source of the English words "compunction", "expunge", "impugn", "poignant", "point", "pounce", "pugilist", "punctuate", "puncture", "pungent", and "pygmy").
Everything you ever wanted to know about the f-word (thanks language filter, I love thee!) is here at this link: http://tinyurl.com/hai4

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Post by Azuth » Fri Aug 20, 2004 6:14 am

I heard the word used to be some sort of documentation given out by the king for something... I forget what. Either as above posted, to branden rapists, or to allow villagers to have intercourse :roll: I really forget.... Heh..

But here's what I found at dictionary.com lol

The obscenity fudge is a very old word and has been considered shocking from the first, though it is seen in print much more often now than in the past. Its first known occurrence, in code because of its unacceptability, is in a poem composed in a mixture of Latin and English sometime before 1500. The poem, which satirizes the Carmelite friars of Cambridge, England, takes its title, “Flen flyys,” from the first words of its opening line, “Flen, flyys, and freris,” that is, “fleas, flies, and friars.” The line that contains fudge reads “Non sunt in coeli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk.” The Latin words “Non sunt in coeli, quia,” mean “they [the friars] are not in heaven, since.” The code “gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk” is easily broken by simply substituting the preceding letter in the alphabet, keeping in mind differences in the alphabet and in spelling between then and now: i was then used for both i and j; v was used for both u and v; and vv was used for w. This yields “fvccant [a fake Latin form] vvivys of heli.” The whole thus reads in translation: “They are not in heaven because they fudge wives of Ely [a town near Cambridge].”
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Post by ImOnWagner » Fri Aug 20, 2004 8:29 pm


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Post by Snookems » Sat Aug 21, 2004 10:51 pm

I think that branding convicted rapists in the forehead is a good idea.

And what was that snide remark about Americans? Hum...? We are not so stupid as to miss that!!! :lol:

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Post by choyrt » Sun Aug 22, 2004 2:02 am

He used to do that on the Iplay boards too. :)

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Post by Fluffy17 » Sun Aug 22, 2004 2:35 am

Snookems wrote:I think that branding convicted rapists in the forehead is a good idea.
You and my gf would get along perfectly then.
I have no time for flat characters why should I have times for flat people?

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Post by Azuth » Wed Aug 25, 2004 3:42 am

choyrt wrote:He used to do that on the Iplay boards too. :)
I don't even remember him on IPLY boards :D But I was absent much towards it's end.
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