Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Collins

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Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Collins

Post by the paperboy » Fri Aug 02, 2013 2:51 pm

An article by Winterwind's Assistant Editor, Michael S. Collins, on Agatha Christie and the art of writing.

http://www.winterwind-productions.com/f ... _christie/
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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Joseph » Fri Aug 02, 2013 3:01 pm

I have to confess, though obviously familiar with Agatha Christie, and having seen some TV adaptations of her work, I've never actually read any of her books. Terrible I know but then I read very little fiction. I should rectify that. Still, an excellent article, Michael.

Oh, and the spoiler warning and tale of having spoiled Hamlet for someone... hilarious!

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Michael S Collins » Fri Aug 02, 2013 4:08 pm

Heh, it did actually happen, on Gallifrey Base when the David Tennant Hamlet was on TV.

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Marcus » Wed Aug 07, 2013 3:22 pm

She written a lot of interesting things.
Miss Marple is a fun TV show and the french detective...did she write him to? Mister Poirot?

Midsummer murder, inspired by her mayhaps?

Aside of that. I do not really read her books. I tend to avoid crime books since we have a ton in Sweden, like Wallander! And they are in my opinion meh and horrendous.

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Joseph » Wed Aug 07, 2013 3:43 pm

I'd forgotten about Poirot. I watched the David Suchet series. How did I forget Poirot was Christie's?

I really should make a point of reading her books but a lot of authors/books from that era have biased me against it. Not hers of course so I should give her a chance.

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Marcus » Wed Aug 07, 2013 3:47 pm

Poirot I like a lot.

What about being biased against them?

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Joseph » Wed Aug 07, 2013 3:55 pm

I'm not a fan of a lot of writers from the 1920s and 1930s. For example I personally think that F. Scott Fitzgerald is a hack and The Great Gatsby is one of the most over-rated books of all time. So when it comes to reading, and I don't read much fiction, I'll easily skip anything from that era.

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Marcus » Wed Aug 07, 2013 4:01 pm

Understandable. Strindbergh, the most Swedish one is also very weird and wonk and he was around that era to late 1800,early 1900.

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Joseph » Wed Aug 07, 2013 4:07 pm

I think you're only getting part of my point.

I love the 1800s. I read Dickens, Dostoevsky and Hugo for pleasure. I just don't care for the 1920s and 1930s literary output.

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Michael S Collins » Wed Aug 07, 2013 10:21 pm

Joseph wrote:I think you're only getting part of my point.

I love the 1800s. I read Dickens, Dostoevsky and Hugo for pleasure. I just don't care for the 1920s and 1930s literary output.
I'm not particularly fond of the 20s and 30s in literature myself, yet two of my favourite writers, Orwell and Christie, came from that period. Still, all rules are made to be broken.

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Col

Post by Marcus » Mon Aug 12, 2013 3:45 pm

Ah I see what you mean I think. I presume the 20s and 30s is very influenced by the dark world war I (Which I presume, is pretty out "darked" by World war II which probably influenced even more dark writing) :(

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Re: Agatha Christie and the Art of Writing by Michael S. Collins

Post by Jez » Tue Aug 27, 2013 9:21 pm

A lovely piece, Michael -

I too must confess to not having read a single Christie classic, despite having been raised on any number of TV adaptations - Joan Hickson's 'Miss Marple' is surely the best!

But you've inspired me - I now plan to pick up the books you mention and give them a look for myself.

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